A review of the new horror film, on Shudder now

I’ve enjoyed a number of director Neil Marshall’s films in the past. The Descent is, of course, a modern masterpiece of unbearable tension. Centurion looks phenomenal. I even saw Doomsday with a bunch of friends for my 18th birthday; I remember loving its messy, wanton genre-mashing, appreciating its gonzo energy and fun action-horror setpieces in a way my friends very much did not click with.

All that is to say I was interested in his newest film The Reckoning, which has been released on Shudder. I was hoping for a glimmer of the weirdness of Doomsday, but would have certainly…

A review of the new historical drama, on Netflix now

Last week, Netflix quietly released an early contender for my favorite film of 2021. Dance of the Forty One (el Baile de los 41) is a lush, sensual experience, one that uses its luxurious production values to tell a story of painful Queer history exactly the way it should be told: with a focus on the intimacy, the art, and the resilience of a community that refused to let itself be snuffed out by oppression.

Director David Pablos’s film takes place at the dawn of the 20th century and focuses on the double life of Mexican congressman Ignacio de la…

A review of the new horror film, on Netflix Friday, April 30th

Let’s get something straight right away: Things Heard and Seen, Netflix’s new horror movie starring freshly-minted Oscar nominee Amanda Seyfried, is not good. It’s never less than watchable, but clocking in at nearly two hours, the film is overlong and stretches its already-thin story past the breaking point.

However, once the film breaks, Things Heard and Seen is fascinating. Over the course of the final half hour, the film becomes gradually unmoored from narrative concerns, ending as a collage of evocative imagery that takes the pieces of the wreckage of the film’s story and fashions them into something wholly odd.

A review of the new romantic drama, in theaters and on demand March 5th

Sam (Donal Logue) is a man whose life is full of regrets. He carries them around like a literal weight on his shoulders, trudging through the world followed always by the sins of his past. When Sometime Other Than Now begins, Sam is lying unconscious on the beach, the waves gently lapping at his body; his motorcycle lays half-submerged nearby, and we wonder at first if he might be dead and waking up on the shores of some kind of seaside purgatory.

It soon becomes clear, though, that he’s very much still alive and the real purgatory was the life…

A preview of the 24-hour livestreamed film festival… and something extra?

An interesting press release showed up in my inbox today, announcing a virtual film festival taking place in March. The Unnamed Footage Festival, which normally takes place in San Francisco, typically showcases “a unique and often obscure selection of found footage horror, first-person POV cinema, and faux documentary.” This year, though, instead of being held at their typical venues, the Unnamed Footage Festival will be what organizers are calling a “24-hour long webathon.”

UFF24hr will be a live, one-time-only, day-long marathon of weird and exclusive in-world camera features and shorts, alongside Q&As with filmmakers and industry professionals. Beginning on March…

A review of the new film, on demand now

Look: it’s no secret that Los Angeles is experiencing a major homelessness crisis. As of last month, an estimated 66,000 people are currently homeless in Los Angeles County in the middle of a deadly pandemic and some of the worst economic fallout in many generations.

Paradise Cove, a new erotic thriller directed by Martin Guigui, attempts to reckon with that context, and in doing so mishandles it in nearly every way. The film is about Knox and Tracey Bannett (Todd Grinnell and Mena Suvari, respectively), a couple who move into Knox’s mother’s beach house in Malibu in order to renovate…

A review of the new romance, streaming at the Reel Love Film Festival this week

This week, leading up through Valentine’s Day, I’ll be reviewing films out of the Reel Love Film Festival. Reel Love is a new virtual fest “dedicated to honoring the future of love on screen and its profound cinematic legacy thus far.”

Tim Sutton has an eye for compelling, evocative imagery. Directing from his own script, he constantly finds moments in his new film Funny Face that are so acutely-observed, so bewitching, that they seem to slip the film out of reality and into a more dreamlike, fairytale state. A man in a grotesque rictus mask and a woman in a…

A review of the new black comedy, at the Reel Love Film Fest this week

This week, leading up through Valentine’s Day, I’ll be reviewing films out of the Reel Love Film Festival. Reel Love is a new virtual fest “dedicated to honoring the future of love on screen and its profound cinematic legacy thus far.”

The Reel Love Film Festival’s LGBTQ+-centric feature selection is somewhat lacking for a festival whose aim is to show “the future of love on screen.” Aside from (excellent) closing-night selection Shiva Baby, about a bisexual girl struggling to keep her life together during a particularly chaotic shiva, the only other full-length film tagged as LGBTQ+ on the festival’s schedule…

A review of the new romantic drama, showing this week at the Reel Love Film Festival

This week, leading up through Valentine’s Day, I’ll be reviewing films out of the Reel Love Film Festival. Reel Love is a new virtual fest “dedicated to honoring the future of love on screen and its profound cinematic legacy thus far.”

Writer/director Sabrina Doyle’s debut film Lorelei is a strange one. Part post-prison drama, part romance, and part class commentary, Lorelei is messy and unfocused, spending far too much time on some parts of its story and giving others the short shrift. …

A review of the new docuseries, on Netflix February 10th

A press release for Netflix’s surefire smash Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel describes the show as “the first season in a new documentary series that deconstructs the mythology and mystery surrounding infamous locations in contemporary crime.” That’s a crucial thing to keep in mind while watching director Joe Berlinger’s addictive show, which ends up being a brilliantly-constructed cautionary tale about the genre as a whole. …

Eric Langberg

Interests: bad horror movies, queering mainstream films, Classic Hollywood.

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